BlogHer is a broad platform for sharing ideas, opinions, stories on all subjects. So far nothing special. But it is the first multi-platform multimedia network created by and for women, bloggers and leaders in social media (There are still men among the partners). It perfectly embodies the new trend of quality content since the authors are all strongly committed to their blogs to promote excellent writing and this excellence is available in the feminine!

The month of November having started, BlogHer will for the eighth time celebrate NaBloPoMo, National Blog Posting Month, in partnership this year with WordPress, a challenge which requires bloggers to post daily.

What is Blog Her?

“But where are the bloggers”? This is the founding question of the company, posed by its creators Elisa Camahort Page, Lisa Stone, Jory Des Jardins in 2005. Since then, BlogHer, platform of female blogs for women, continues a meteoric rise then that currently according to the figures Nielsen’s community reached a cumulative audience of 92 million women in 2013 including blogs, Pinterest, Twitter, Facebook. It also hosts the world’s largest conferences on women in social media. Blog Her, by allowing women to find their way and express themselves with passion on subjects as diverse as fashion, politics or economics and trade, seduces and attracts some of the greatest talents of the web and influencers ( more than 7000) on social networks.

To join the BlogHer community it is necessary to be at least 18 years old, to provide well-written texts likely to encourage strong engagement from the network of readers, to present subjects intended to appeal to an audience of women, to publish regularly, at less once a week. In any case, women who post come from all walks of life like Zainab, a 28-year-old blogger, a doctoral student in neuroscience who has discovered a passion for cooking. Or a lawyer who humorously exposes her life on her blog, gives legal advice and talks about the difficulties a woman encounters when she works and raises her children … You can find all the themes on BlogHer!

BlogHer also has a research center which analyzes, through surveys, women’s digital behavior, their purchases, their discussions and once a week community members give their opinion on a subject from “politics to culture pop ”to use the words of the blogging platform.

Home BlogHer Screenshot
Home BlogHer Screenshot

NaBloPoMo

NaBloPoMo, created in 2006 by blogger and columnist for the New York Times Eden Kennedy, also included in the best blogging moms by the Wall Street Journal, was acquired by BlogHer 5 years later and quickly went from one month to one real habit for bloggers to post daily, in order to attract a large traffic and a large audience on their blog. During the competition, they are continuously coached and supported by advice intended to encourage them to improve, progress and gain greater self-confidence. Last year NaBloPoMo managed to reach an audience of 1.5 million readers! Throughout the month of November Ipad tablets and other prizes will be awarded, such as passes for the next BlogHer anniversary conference in June in San José (Ca).

This year, therefore, the partnership with WordPress will make it possible to provide blogging, videoblogging and photo resources to further enhance the commitment of the competitors. and set up the writing of “daily prompt”, sort of “highlights”. The Daily Post, for its part, which has just presented a guide for blogging contests, represented the inaugural event of this performance.

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To those who are still wondering about the interest of participating in this challenge over a month, here are 5 good reasons stated by its founder, in addition of course to improve her writing style through daily work: a publication every day allows you to make yourself known, to ritualize the process of writing so that it becomes natural, to learn from its “zero” publications … Nothing that departs from the advice that can be read on the web to become a real blogger or to improve as such.

The fact remains that the process of creating a multi-platform network for the use of women and above all the immense success that this network quickly experienced in the USA seems to correspond to a need for recognition, for community belonging based on real complicity and strong mutual aid. Would this kind of company like BlogHer also have a future in Europe?